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Drug-Free Workplace, Campus and Community

MCC is committed to a safe, secure, healthful, drug-free work, campus, and community environment, and has adopted the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act and Drug-Free Workplace Act standards as part of its own policies. All applicable alcohol and drug regulations, including federal and state underage drinking laws, are enforced. The unlawful possession, use, and/or sale of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs are specifically prohibited and violations carry substantial sanctions up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and/or referral for prosecution.

MCC standards of conduct prohibit the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees on the college’s property or as part of any of its activities. Alcohol is permitted on college property only in certain limited circumstances when required approvals have been obtained.

Laws you need to know

Illegal Possession of Alcohol

Any person under the age of 21 that purchases, asks for, or in any way receives intoxicating liquor can be charged with a misdemeanor.

Use or Possession of a Fake ID

Any person who is less than 21 years of age, who uses a reproduced, modified, or altered license for the purpose of purchasing, asking for or in any way receiving any intoxicating liquor can be charged with a misdemeanor.

Open Container

Any person who possesses an open container of alcohol on any street, sidewalk or city parking facility could be charged with a misdemeanor.

Selling Alcohol without a License

It shall be unlawful for any person to sell alcohol, in any quantity, without acquiring a liquor license. If you sell alcohol at or charge admission to a party, the person accepting the money could be charged with selling liquor without a license. Sentences for this violation involve up to two years in prison and/or fines of up to $1,000. If the alcohol is served to a minor, the server could also be charged with supplying alcohol to a minor. 10/2013

Keg Registration

All retailers selling beer kegs must register the keg and affix a seal on the keg at the time of sale. The retailer will log the purchaser’s name, address, and the acknowledgement of proper use and care of the keg. If a keg is confiscated by the police at a party at which underage persons have consumed alcohol, the purchaser of the keg can be identified – and arrested or fined – for supplying alcohol to underage persons. If a keg is returned with an ID tag defaced or missing, the deposit fee required at the time of sale is forfeited.

DWI

The legal blood alcohol content (BAC) limit for DWI is .08. Those under 21 could be found guilty of a Zero Tolerance violation if their BAC is above .02. Consequences could include: fines, license revocation, classes, community service, and jail time, as well as misdemeanor or felony charges on one’s record.

Abuse and Lose Law

In Missouri, anyone under 21 years old and operating a motor vehicle with either alcohol or illegal drugs in their possession can have their driver’s license revoked for 90 days. The Abuse and Lose law also requires that your license be revoked for 90 days if you commit any of the following offenses: any alcohol related traffic offense; possessing or using an illegal drug; altering a driver’s license; trying to use someone else’s driver license. Second and subsequent offenses result in a one year license suspension.

Minor in Possession by Consumption Law

Provides that any person under the age of 21, who purchases or attempts to purchase, or has in his or her possession, any intoxicating substance is guilty of a misdemeanor. This act provides that a minor is also guilty of a misdemeanor for a “minor in possession” if he or she is “visibly intoxicated” or has a detectable blood alcohol content of .02.

Source: University of Missouri

Federal Laws

Federal law provides criminal and civil penalties for unlawful possession or distribution of drugs and alcohol.  Among incarceration and/or fines, there are federal laws allowing the forfeiture of property used in possession or to facilitate possession of a controlled substance. This could include homes, vehicles, boats, aircrafts and any other personal or real property.

Financial Aid Eligibility

All applicable alcohol and drug regulations, including federal and state underage drinking laws, are enforced. The unlawful possession, use, and/or sale of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs are specifically prohibited and violations carry substantial sanctions up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and/or referral for prosecution. (See MCC Board Policy and District Regulation 3.30060, §§195.003, RSMo et. seq.) The state of Missouri sets the minimum age to purchase or possess any alcoholic beverage at 21. Specific ordinances regarding violations of alcohol laws, including driving while intoxicated are available from the MCC Police Department. Specific state laws pertaining to alcohol include: Drug convictions while enrolled as a student at MCC may affect a student’s eligibility for federal student aid.

A federal or state drug conviction can disqualify a student from receiving federal financial aid funds. The conviction must have occurred during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving Title IV aid (i.e., Federal Pell Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Stafford Loan, etc.). Depending on whether the conviction was for sale or possession and if the student has previous offenses, the period of ineligibility can range from one year to an indefinite period. The student regains eligibility the day after the period of ineligibility ends or the student successfully completes a qualified drug rehabilitation program as defined in the Higher Education Amendments. 

For more information visit the Federal Student Aid Website at

Information for Financial Aid Professionals (IFAP)

Graphic from Mohawk Valley Community College.

Last Modified: 1/30/19