Business and Technology

HOW TO ENROLL:

1.     First, see your high school counselor for more information.

2.     Then, plan to attend an information session or schedule a visit to the MCC-BT with your parent/s or guardian/s. Call 816-604-5216 for details.

Register for a visit online

 
 

Early College

Get a head start.

MCC-Business & Technology and your high school have developed a new program option for students eager to build skills in two high-skill, high-demand technical career fields: Engineering Technology and Design and Industrial Technology. Both programs give you a head start toward a college certificate or degree and put you in a good position to qualify for paid internships and for jobs with Kansas City area companies.

The Details

Who: These programs are open to juniors and seniors who have expressed an interest in the featured career pathways.

Where: Metropolitan Community College-Business & Technology campus, 1775 Universal Avenue, Kansas City, Mo., 64120. Your school district will provide transportation from your high school to the campus.

When:  The programs begin in August and run according to the MCC academic calendar (mcckc.edu/calendar). You will be on campus from 8 - 10:30 a.m. or 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Cost:  Your school district will cover all costs associated with the program (tuition, books and fees).

Why: By participating in an Early College program, you will…

  • Earn college credit – and save time and money toward completing a college degree.
  • Gain academic skills needed to succeed in college-level coursework.
  • Clarify your career interests and goals – and develop a plan so you know where you’re going!
  • Build the skills that can help you land a paid internship or entry-level job right out of high school and put you on the path to a rewarding career.

 

MCC Certificate or AAS degree*

Prepares you for

Next level

Salary**

Computer-aided drafting/design Entry-level position in engineering or manufacturing design Bachelor's degree in engineering technology or technology management $41,000 (AAS degree)
Engineering technology-architecture Entry-level position in residential or commercial architectural design.
Engineering technology-Manufacturing/mechanical Entry-level positions as an industrial design technician. $46,000 (AAS degree)
       
Instruments and controls Entry-level position as a robotics or electro-mechanical technician. Bachelor's degree in industrial technology or technology management. $57,400 (AAS degree)
Industrial electrical Entry-level positions as an industrial electrician or success on the Electrical Workers Apprenticeship application exam. 57,700-96,000 (AAS Degree)
Photovoltaic technology Entry-level sola/photovoltaic installation and repair technician. $35,300 (certificate)
* See www.mcckc.edu/progs/  (Computer-Aided Drafting, Engineering Technology, Industrial Electrician, Instrumentation and Controls, Photovoltaics)
** U.S. Department of Labor O*net Online: www.onetonline.org

 

 

Engineering Technology: Design the Future

Engineering technicians work hand-in-hand with engineers, technologists, industrial designers, and production specialists to design, create and manufacture almost anything you can imagine. A wide variety of products are brought to life by technology teams, including aircraft, automobiles, motorcycles, and ATVs; consumer products, ranging from personal electronics to recreation; biomedical devices, such as artificial heart valves; and even power plants that run entire cities. This program will give you solid foundational skills in computer-aided drafting and design (CADD), parametric modeling, prototyping and residential design. If you complete both years of the program, you will earn 15 college credits toward various degrees in MCC's Engineering Technology program.

Technical Courses

Semester 1

Engineering Graphics and CADD I  (ETEC 152 – 5 credits)
This course is an introduction to engineering graphics - the "language" of design, technical drawing, computer-aided drafting/design (CADD) and the design process. Working in the campus FabLab, you will design and build three projects using geometric and design concepts and skills.

College 100 (COLL 100 - 1 Credit)
The course is designed to help students adjust to the MCC community, develop a better understanding of the learning process and acquire essential academic survival skills.

Semester 2

Parametric Modeling (ETEC 270 – 3 credits)
This course gives you an in-depth introduction to parametric or solid modeling technology using AutoDesk InventorTM software. Working in the Prototyping and FabLabs, you will complete three projects linking design software and rapid prototyping. Manufacturing and engineering rely heavily on technicians who can design and develop prototypes -- the samples or models built to test and improve a concept or process.

Semester 3

Introduction to Residential Architectural Drafting (ETEC 155 – 3 credits)
An overview of house design, this course will introduce you to all aspects of the design of a modern single-family residence. Working in the CADD lab, you will produce working drawings for the construction of a house. As a member of a student team, you will build a scale home that includes a foundation, frame, roof, wiring and plumbing.

Semester 4

Special Topics in Engineering Design (ETEC 199 – 3 credits)
This course gives you an opportunity to work in the FabLab and Prototyping Lab to design and complete your own architectural or mechanical project from concept sketch to construction using the skills and knowledge you learned in the first three classes. Specific design criteria and budgetary constraints will be used to guide your project.

Program Structure

You will spend most of your time on campus in your technical courses. A portion of your day, though, will be spent in an innovative Engineering Technology Academic Learning Community where you will review the specific math, reading and writing skills you are encountering in your design and prototyping classes. The purpose for this targeted academic support is to make sure you master the technical concepts you’re studying and that you are well prepared for additional college-level work when you graduate from high school. You also complete College 100, a one-credit orientation to college course required of all MCC students.

 

Industrial Technology: Make it Work!

Industrial electronics rules the world! Industrial automation technologies are the "invisible hands" that make modern life possible. Almost anything you can think of, from generation of electricity and energy, manufacturing of all products, building climate controls, and even traffic lights, depends upon industrial technologies to make them run - - and "armies" of expert industrial craftspeople to keep them running!  Industrial technicians ensure the smooth, efficient functioning of manufacturing production processes. They install, test, repair and adjust electrical machinery and electrical control equipment to detect and prevent problems that could cost manufacturers millions of dollars in lost production time. These technicians are in high demand and paid accordingly. This program will introduce you to basic electrical principles, safety, print reading, motor controls and programmable logic controllers – the devices that are at the heart of modern automation systems. You will also use your new skills to build a photovoltaic or solar system. If you complete both years of the program, you will earn 20 college credits toward various certificates and degrees in MCC’s Industrial or Engineering Technology programs – and be well prepared to present a solid application for an Electrical Worker apprenticeship program. 

Technical Courses

Semester 1

College 100 (COLL 100 - 1 credit)
The course is designed to help students adjust to the MCC community, develop a better understanding of the learning process and acquire essential academic survival skills.

Electrical Safety (INTE 107 – 1 credit)
This course provides an introduction to electrical safety rules and procedures in industrial settings. Using multimeters to measure resistance and low voltages, you will learn how to work safely around live electrical circuits and in an electrical lab setting generally.

Industrial Electrical DC Principles (INTE 112 – 2 credits)
This course is an introductory course for the individual who is moving into an industrial maintenance or related activity. Behavior of electricity, sources of electricity, Ohms' and Watt's laws in DC circuits. The student will learn basic concepts in direct current circuits and applications.

Semester 2

Industrial Electrical AC Principles (INTE 113 – 2 credits)
This course will build on the concepts learned in INTE 112 and expand into alternating circuit concepts including introduction to transformers and 3 phase power distribution.

Electrical Print Reading (INTE 115 – 3 credits)
This course will teach you how to interpret electrical blueprints used in residential, commercial and industrial maintenance settings, starting with basic house-wiring diagrams and working progressively into industrial electrical prints. You will learn how to locate electrical components and install them according to industry standards.

Semester 3

Introduction to Motor Controls (INTE 175 - 3 credits)
Electric motors make much of the world go around. In industry, they are found in industrial fans, blowers and pumps, machine tools and disk drives. They may be powered by direct or alternating current from a central electrical distribution grid or inverter. This course will teach you how motors work. You will assemble, wire and troubleshoot various controls and, working in a team, develop a creative motor function.

Solar/Photovoltaic Systems (INTE 185 – 4 credits)
Learn how solar radiation is used in photovoltaic technology by building a solar system. You will gain an understanding of the principles and practices for safe design and how to install and troubleshoot these new and increasingly prevalent systems.

Semester 4

Programmable Logic Controllers I (INTE 271 - 4 credits)
Programmable logic controllers (PLC) are industrial computers that control automated processes. You will learn to write industrial computer code and implement an automated process using motors, timers, relays, counters, etc.

Program Structure

You will spend most of your time on campus in your technical courses. A portion of your day, though, will be spent in an innovative Industrial Technology Academic Learning Community where you will review the specific math, reading and writing skills you are encountering in your electrical classes. The purpose for this targeted academic support is to make sure you master the technical concepts you’re studying and that you are well prepared for additional college-level work when you graduate from high school. You also complete College 100, a one-credit orientation to college course required of all MCC students.

Last Modified: 12/11/13